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Can someone explain the North Korea threat 22:08 - Apr 5 with 889 viewsHewitt1986

In idiot language. Thanks
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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 22:10 - Apr 5 with 879 viewsjeera

Some fat spoilt kid fancies his chances.

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 22:18 - Apr 5 with 834 viewsblueasfook

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 22:10 - Apr 5 by jeera

Some fat spoilt kid fancies his chances.


Pretty much spot on yeah :)

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 22:20 - Apr 5 with 841 viewsCanadianBlue

Man-Child wants to show his government that he's a leader, waves his genitals around.

US/SK wave their genitals around in reply.

We're just waiting to see which one begins flying first.
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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 22:21 - Apr 5 with 834 viewsC_HealyIsAPleasure

Them there asian folk and their backwards ways are hooting and hollering and them there yankee heroes have got emselves involved and we got ourselves a good ol fashioned mexican standoff here or what!

Highlighting crass stupidity since sometime around 2010
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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:14 - Apr 5 with 746 viewsstickymockwell

Errrrrr north korea wanna blow up amerrrica because north korea bad.

Give him a ball and a yard of grass

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:18 - Apr 5 with 761 viewsGuthrum

Once upon a time there was a land in eastern Asia named Korea.
In the early 1900s, it was taken over, occupied and then ruled by the Japanese. At the end of the Second World War in 1945, Japan had been defeated and lost Korea.
Temporarily, the Soviet Union was in charge of the northern half and the USA in charge of the southern half, until a proper government could be established. However, the Soviets and the Americans soon fell out, starting the Cold War, and Korea was never reunited.
In 1950, the North invaded the South. The USA helped the South and the Chinese and Soviets then helped the North. The war ended in a stalemate and, eventually, a ceasefire. But no permanent peace was made, so North and South remain technically at war.

THEN, ABOUT 50 YEARS LATER ...

North Korea is developing nuclear weapons and long-range missiles. This is very bad for other countries in the surrounding area and the USA, with all of whom they are not on good terms.
Everyone else wants to stop this happening (partly just in case they end up being given to other troublesome countries or to terrorists), so they've cut off supplies of anything which might help North Korea to make these things. North Korea is not happy about this and has started throwing its weight around.

OR

After the bloody war in the 1950s, which ended in stalemate rather than a real solution, North Korea turned into an isolated, totalitarian state, run by the Kim family. China and, up to the 1960s the Soviet Union, were its only allies.
With its increasingly huge military and general inefficiency, North Korea became highly dependent upon foreign aid, much of it from China. All the time, North Korea was telling its people that the rest of the world wanted to destroy the nation. Whenever more aid was needed, the North Koreans would make threats, such as military action against South Korea, or developing nuclear weapons. Often this led to negotiations. concessions were made and the aid given.
Then the second ruler, Kim Jong Il died and his son, Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over. After a quite promising start, the threats began again. They built up, faster and faster. Neighbouring countries and their allies, including the USA, began responding to the threats. Soon, the situation reached - and passed - fever pitch. No-one is backing down and we wait to see what will happen.

OR

Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over from his dead father as leader North Korea.
The father, Kim Jong Il, had run the country on a philosophy named "Military First", which is pretty much how it sounds. All money went to the armed forces, while the people starved and the economy staggered. Jong Un, educated in Switzerland and seeing Chinese economic prosperity, may have wanted to move the country into a better economic path, looking to industial and agricultural reforms. The very powerful military may have taken fright at this (which would mean they got less money) and started a power struggle, possibly with the intention of overthrowing Jong Un.
Part of this struggle would have involved militaristic broadcasts on the official state media (full of traditional propaganda, much of it directed against the old enemies from the 1950s, South Korea and the USA) and Jong Un trying to demonstrate he was in charge of the armed forces, not the other way round.
Unfortunately, from outside, that would look a lot like North Korea was gearing up for war and other countries began to react as a consequence, raising tensions in the region.

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:21 - Apr 5 with 720 viewsTruce

The dangerously nutty country with all of the brainwashed idiot inhabitants and missiles has gone at got itself involved in a row with.....North Korea

On a serious note the west are full of propaganda to believe NK are dangerous nutters and NK is full of the same to believe that about the west.

Who knows if any of it is true?


Personally I think the North is jealous about gangnam style

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:36 - Apr 5 with 701 viewsStNeotsBlue

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:18 - Apr 5 by Guthrum

Once upon a time there was a land in eastern Asia named Korea.
In the early 1900s, it was taken over, occupied and then ruled by the Japanese. At the end of the Second World War in 1945, Japan had been defeated and lost Korea.
Temporarily, the Soviet Union was in charge of the northern half and the USA in charge of the southern half, until a proper government could be established. However, the Soviets and the Americans soon fell out, starting the Cold War, and Korea was never reunited.
In 1950, the North invaded the South. The USA helped the South and the Chinese and Soviets then helped the North. The war ended in a stalemate and, eventually, a ceasefire. But no permanent peace was made, so North and South remain technically at war.

THEN, ABOUT 50 YEARS LATER ...

North Korea is developing nuclear weapons and long-range missiles. This is very bad for other countries in the surrounding area and the USA, with all of whom they are not on good terms.
Everyone else wants to stop this happening (partly just in case they end up being given to other troublesome countries or to terrorists), so they've cut off supplies of anything which might help North Korea to make these things. North Korea is not happy about this and has started throwing its weight around.

OR

After the bloody war in the 1950s, which ended in stalemate rather than a real solution, North Korea turned into an isolated, totalitarian state, run by the Kim family. China and, up to the 1960s the Soviet Union, were its only allies.
With its increasingly huge military and general inefficiency, North Korea became highly dependent upon foreign aid, much of it from China. All the time, North Korea was telling its people that the rest of the world wanted to destroy the nation. Whenever more aid was needed, the North Koreans would make threats, such as military action against South Korea, or developing nuclear weapons. Often this led to negotiations. concessions were made and the aid given.
Then the second ruler, Kim Jong Il died and his son, Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over. After a quite promising start, the threats began again. They built up, faster and faster. Neighbouring countries and their allies, including the USA, began responding to the threats. Soon, the situation reached - and passed - fever pitch. No-one is backing down and we wait to see what will happen.

OR

Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over from his dead father as leader North Korea.
The father, Kim Jong Il, had run the country on a philosophy named "Military First", which is pretty much how it sounds. All money went to the armed forces, while the people starved and the economy staggered. Jong Un, educated in Switzerland and seeing Chinese economic prosperity, may have wanted to move the country into a better economic path, looking to industial and agricultural reforms. The very powerful military may have taken fright at this (which would mean they got less money) and started a power struggle, possibly with the intention of overthrowing Jong Un.
Part of this struggle would have involved militaristic broadcasts on the official state media (full of traditional propaganda, much of it directed against the old enemies from the 1950s, South Korea and the USA) and Jong Un trying to demonstrate he was in charge of the armed forces, not the other way round.
Unfortunately, from outside, that would look a lot like North Korea was gearing up for war and other countries began to react as a consequence, raising tensions in the region.


On pretty much every feature in the media, the hired expert will add to the end of his/her summary "of course this is to an extent educated guesswork as North Korea is so cut off from everything" or similar.
There was an excellent post by someone on here the other day from somebody who'd spent some time there installing something or other.
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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:38 - Apr 5 with 693 viewsGuthrum

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:36 - Apr 5 by StNeotsBlue

On pretty much every feature in the media, the hired expert will add to the end of his/her summary "of course this is to an extent educated guesswork as North Korea is so cut off from everything" or similar.
There was an excellent post by someone on here the other day from somebody who'd spent some time there installing something or other.


Indeed, that's why the third of my alternative scenarios was carefully hedged about with "maybe" and "possibly".

The post you were referring to:

That chubby little Korean chappy by Battersea_Blue 4 Apr 15:56
I'm probably one of the few westerners to have been to North Korea. I was there for 6 weeks in the early 80's, installing a typesetting system to their "government press". I could write a book on the experience I had. Absolutely unbelievable. Talk about suppression - the people there have no clue about the outside world, just what they're told. They used one hotel to put all the westeners in. We had drivers, interpreters, liaison officers and were only left alone on Sundays. But we were followed everywhere. No bars, no restaurants - absolutely nothing to do except get very inebriated in the very small bar they had on the top floor of the hotel - something we did pretty much every night. The only communication we had with our western head office was via telex and we were allowed 1 phone call a week to UK that we had to sit around and wait for all day on Sunday. It took 4-5 hours to get the call done, all organised by their "post office". On a Sunday there'd be 30-odd of us sitting in the post office. The one and only outside line would ring, one of us would pick it up and then try to determine who's wife/girlfriend it was on the other end. They listened in and recorded every call. The only written communication allowed out of the country was a choice of 4 postcards, all with pictures of the North Korean military with a line on the bottom of every one that said "smash the USA, the sworn enemy of the Korean people". The highlight of our week was a Thursday night, when we were invited to the Russian Embassy by their diplomats for a vodka-induced booze up. They hated it there as much as we did.

[Post edited 5 Apr 23:47]

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:44 - Apr 5 with 664 viewsalexharban


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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:59 - Apr 5 with 627 viewsStNeotsBlue

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:38 - Apr 5 by Guthrum

Indeed, that's why the third of my alternative scenarios was carefully hedged about with "maybe" and "possibly".

The post you were referring to:

That chubby little Korean chappy by Battersea_Blue 4 Apr 15:56
I'm probably one of the few westerners to have been to North Korea. I was there for 6 weeks in the early 80's, installing a typesetting system to their "government press". I could write a book on the experience I had. Absolutely unbelievable. Talk about suppression - the people there have no clue about the outside world, just what they're told. They used one hotel to put all the westeners in. We had drivers, interpreters, liaison officers and were only left alone on Sundays. But we were followed everywhere. No bars, no restaurants - absolutely nothing to do except get very inebriated in the very small bar they had on the top floor of the hotel - something we did pretty much every night. The only communication we had with our western head office was via telex and we were allowed 1 phone call a week to UK that we had to sit around and wait for all day on Sunday. It took 4-5 hours to get the call done, all organised by their "post office". On a Sunday there'd be 30-odd of us sitting in the post office. The one and only outside line would ring, one of us would pick it up and then try to determine who's wife/girlfriend it was on the other end. They listened in and recorded every call. The only written communication allowed out of the country was a choice of 4 postcards, all with pictures of the North Korean military with a line on the bottom of every one that said "smash the USA, the sworn enemy of the Korean people". The highlight of our week was a Thursday night, when we were invited to the Russian Embassy by their diplomats for a vodka-induced booze up. They hated it there as much as we did.

[Post edited 5 Apr 23:47]


That's the one.

I wasn't being critical of your (very good) summary by the way.
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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 00:04 - Apr 6 with 606 viewsSergio_Georgini

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:18 - Apr 5 by Guthrum

Once upon a time there was a land in eastern Asia named Korea.
In the early 1900s, it was taken over, occupied and then ruled by the Japanese. At the end of the Second World War in 1945, Japan had been defeated and lost Korea.
Temporarily, the Soviet Union was in charge of the northern half and the USA in charge of the southern half, until a proper government could be established. However, the Soviets and the Americans soon fell out, starting the Cold War, and Korea was never reunited.
In 1950, the North invaded the South. The USA helped the South and the Chinese and Soviets then helped the North. The war ended in a stalemate and, eventually, a ceasefire. But no permanent peace was made, so North and South remain technically at war.

THEN, ABOUT 50 YEARS LATER ...

North Korea is developing nuclear weapons and long-range missiles. This is very bad for other countries in the surrounding area and the USA, with all of whom they are not on good terms.
Everyone else wants to stop this happening (partly just in case they end up being given to other troublesome countries or to terrorists), so they've cut off supplies of anything which might help North Korea to make these things. North Korea is not happy about this and has started throwing its weight around.

OR

After the bloody war in the 1950s, which ended in stalemate rather than a real solution, North Korea turned into an isolated, totalitarian state, run by the Kim family. China and, up to the 1960s the Soviet Union, were its only allies.
With its increasingly huge military and general inefficiency, North Korea became highly dependent upon foreign aid, much of it from China. All the time, North Korea was telling its people that the rest of the world wanted to destroy the nation. Whenever more aid was needed, the North Koreans would make threats, such as military action against South Korea, or developing nuclear weapons. Often this led to negotiations. concessions were made and the aid given.
Then the second ruler, Kim Jong Il died and his son, Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over. After a quite promising start, the threats began again. They built up, faster and faster. Neighbouring countries and their allies, including the USA, began responding to the threats. Soon, the situation reached - and passed - fever pitch. No-one is backing down and we wait to see what will happen.

OR

Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over from his dead father as leader North Korea.
The father, Kim Jong Il, had run the country on a philosophy named "Military First", which is pretty much how it sounds. All money went to the armed forces, while the people starved and the economy staggered. Jong Un, educated in Switzerland and seeing Chinese economic prosperity, may have wanted to move the country into a better economic path, looking to industial and agricultural reforms. The very powerful military may have taken fright at this (which would mean they got less money) and started a power struggle, possibly with the intention of overthrowing Jong Un.
Part of this struggle would have involved militaristic broadcasts on the official state media (full of traditional propaganda, much of it directed against the old enemies from the 1950s, South Korea and the USA) and Jong Un trying to demonstrate he was in charge of the armed forces, not the other way round.
Unfortunately, from outside, that would look a lot like North Korea was gearing up for war and other countries began to react as a consequence, raising tensions in the region.


Nice work!

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 00:10 - Apr 6 with 586 viewsGuthrum

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:59 - Apr 5 by StNeotsBlue

That's the one.

I wasn't being critical of your (very good) summary by the way.


That post made very interesting reading. I only know one person who's been into North Korea. His wife is South Korean and they took the tourist trip across the border (when you still could) to look back from the other direction. Obviously, he didn't get to see the everyday reality in the same way as Battersea Blue.

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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 07:47 - Apr 6 with 424 viewsFred

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 23:18 - Apr 5 by Guthrum

Once upon a time there was a land in eastern Asia named Korea.
In the early 1900s, it was taken over, occupied and then ruled by the Japanese. At the end of the Second World War in 1945, Japan had been defeated and lost Korea.
Temporarily, the Soviet Union was in charge of the northern half and the USA in charge of the southern half, until a proper government could be established. However, the Soviets and the Americans soon fell out, starting the Cold War, and Korea was never reunited.
In 1950, the North invaded the South. The USA helped the South and the Chinese and Soviets then helped the North. The war ended in a stalemate and, eventually, a ceasefire. But no permanent peace was made, so North and South remain technically at war.

THEN, ABOUT 50 YEARS LATER ...

North Korea is developing nuclear weapons and long-range missiles. This is very bad for other countries in the surrounding area and the USA, with all of whom they are not on good terms.
Everyone else wants to stop this happening (partly just in case they end up being given to other troublesome countries or to terrorists), so they've cut off supplies of anything which might help North Korea to make these things. North Korea is not happy about this and has started throwing its weight around.

OR

After the bloody war in the 1950s, which ended in stalemate rather than a real solution, North Korea turned into an isolated, totalitarian state, run by the Kim family. China and, up to the 1960s the Soviet Union, were its only allies.
With its increasingly huge military and general inefficiency, North Korea became highly dependent upon foreign aid, much of it from China. All the time, North Korea was telling its people that the rest of the world wanted to destroy the nation. Whenever more aid was needed, the North Koreans would make threats, such as military action against South Korea, or developing nuclear weapons. Often this led to negotiations. concessions were made and the aid given.
Then the second ruler, Kim Jong Il died and his son, Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over. After a quite promising start, the threats began again. They built up, faster and faster. Neighbouring countries and their allies, including the USA, began responding to the threats. Soon, the situation reached - and passed - fever pitch. No-one is backing down and we wait to see what will happen.

OR

Kim Jong Un, a young man in his late 20s, took over from his dead father as leader North Korea.
The father, Kim Jong Il, had run the country on a philosophy named "Military First", which is pretty much how it sounds. All money went to the armed forces, while the people starved and the economy staggered. Jong Un, educated in Switzerland and seeing Chinese economic prosperity, may have wanted to move the country into a better economic path, looking to industial and agricultural reforms. The very powerful military may have taken fright at this (which would mean they got less money) and started a power struggle, possibly with the intention of overthrowing Jong Un.
Part of this struggle would have involved militaristic broadcasts on the official state media (full of traditional propaganda, much of it directed against the old enemies from the 1950s, South Korea and the USA) and Jong Un trying to demonstrate he was in charge of the armed forces, not the other way round.
Unfortunately, from outside, that would look a lot like North Korea was gearing up for war and other countries began to react as a consequence, raising tensions in the region.


Thanks for the potted history Guthram.
As a child I recall our next door neighbours son going off to war in Korea.
I have done work with S Koreans & have been there but they are not a race I warmed too
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Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 08:14 - Apr 6 with 382 viewsBattersea_Blue

Can someone explain the North Korea threat on 07:47 - Apr 6 by Fred

Thanks for the potted history Guthram.
As a child I recall our next door neighbours son going off to war in Korea.
I have done work with S Koreans & have been there but they are not a race I warmed too


A good summary Guthrum.

When I was there in the early 80's, despite all the propaganda, bravado and rhetoric, it was obvious at that time they had no serious military threat apart from organisation. Yes, they had hardware, but the raw materials for good quality anything was lacking.

For example, we spent every evening in the small bar on the top floor of the only western-biased hotel. There was no draft beer, it was all locally brewed bottled stuff. It was awful, but did the job. However, throughout the entire 6 week period and with 3 of us drinking hundreds of bottles of beer we did not come across 1 bottle that was 100% perpendicular. They stood up at all angles with serious imperfections in the glass itself.

As to the technical ability of the people, that was interesting. My job was to install and configure all the typesetting and page make-up software, then train them. Very early on I could see getting them to understand this technology was going to be nigh on impossible. I decided the best thing would be to find the most qualified person and brain dump on him, so I held a kind of interview process with the interpreter. The most qualified guy was a copper plater who's brother in law once used an old Linotype machine.

This was all 30 years ago of course but I can't believe North Korea have the quality raw materials, know-how, strategy and dynamics to seriously threaten USA, us or any other western country with the exception of the south and this only due to the close proximity.
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