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FAO Guthers & other historians 21:42 - Feb 21 with 528 viewsRyorry

(If you're not already onto it). Was watching Yesterday channel 25 on freeview 8-9pm this eve- fascinating programme called 'War Factories'. Tonight's ep was all about USA rapid shipbuilding systems 1941-45, including Kaiser Companies' construction of emergency shipyards, one of which (Richmond?) needed a whole new town & infrastructure for 150K people to be built, incl med. centres, schools & creches so the women could work too. Amazing stuff.

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 21:49 - Feb 21 with 499 viewsGuthrum

The trick with the Liberty Ships was that parts of the structure were welded upside-down, which increased the speed of manufacture considerably without compromising strength.

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 21:56 - Feb 21 with 486 viewsHARRY10

FAO Guthers & other historians on 21:49 - Feb 21 by Guthrum

The trick with the Liberty Ships was that parts of the structure were welded upside-down, which increased the speed of manufacture considerably without compromising strength.


It was also the case of having pre-farbricated [arts delivered so as to be assembled 9as with cars now) eather than being made on site.

I'm not sure about the figues as my understanding is that the growth in workers was over a 3-4 year period and was more ad hoc than laid out like some post war new town.

It did, however. allow women and 'non whites' to be employed in areas of work previously excluded to them - and also taught them to organise to improve conditions and pay.
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FAO Guthers & other historians on 22:04 - Feb 21 with 472 viewsRyorry

FAO Guthers & other historians on 21:49 - Feb 21 by Guthrum

The trick with the Liberty Ships was that parts of the structure were welded upside-down, which increased the speed of manufacture considerably without compromising strength.


Oh right, interesting, the prog didn't spell that out (or I missed it as making food at same time) - cheers.

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 22:43 - Feb 21 with 431 viewsCoastalblue

FAO Guthers & other historians on 21:56 - Feb 21 by HARRY10

It was also the case of having pre-farbricated [arts delivered so as to be assembled 9as with cars now) eather than being made on site.

I'm not sure about the figues as my understanding is that the growth in workers was over a 3-4 year period and was more ad hoc than laid out like some post war new town.

It did, however. allow women and 'non whites' to be employed in areas of work previously excluded to them - and also taught them to organise to improve conditions and pay.


I think it was the Ken Burns series on the war which had an episode about this, and yes you're right with regards to the female and non white workers. I did seem to recall though that some of these places were built from scratch in quite a short space of time, been a while though so I could be wrong.

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 23:21 - Feb 21 with 403 viewsHARRY10

FAO Guthers & other historians on 22:43 - Feb 21 by Coastalblue

I think it was the Ken Burns series on the war which had an episode about this, and yes you're right with regards to the female and non white workers. I did seem to recall though that some of these places were built from scratch in quite a short space of time, been a while though so I could be wrong.


One of the notable points how much progress was made in child care (creche), schooling and healthcare as Kaiers himself saw the benefits of a healthy and focussed workforce

Something carried on in the postwar Uk with better schooling, the NHS and a massive boost in house building.

Much of this is now needed in the US which has a creaking infrastucture and third world health care system Treat people like sh it and don't be surprised when many behave like sh it. Note the high rate of serious crime in both the US and Russia, then compare it with more enlightened countries like those of Scandinavia.
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FAO Guthers & other historians on 23:50 - Feb 21 with 392 viewsRyorry

FAO Guthers & other historians on 21:56 - Feb 21 by HARRY10

It was also the case of having pre-farbricated [arts delivered so as to be assembled 9as with cars now) eather than being made on site.

I'm not sure about the figues as my understanding is that the growth in workers was over a 3-4 year period and was more ad hoc than laid out like some post war new town.

It did, however. allow women and 'non whites' to be employed in areas of work previously excluded to them - and also taught them to organise to improve conditions and pay.


Yes, the pre-fab parts were explained, along with economies of scale, the mass migration of 'non-whites' etc. It was also interesting that the Richmond (I think it was) site - which was defo a new town constructed from scratch in a v. short period of time, ie a few months - attracted workers not just with excellent pay, but also with an excellent health care scheme - full medical cover for workers & their families could be bought for c. 90cents/week. The vast majority did buy into it, and apparently it's still going - described as one of the best medi-care schemes currently available in the US.

Ironic that Pearl Harbour & the USA reluctantly entering the war were major factors in reviving its economy & bringing the country out of the great depression, largely because of such huge military ship & aircraft building endeavours (according to the prog).

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 23:53 - Feb 21 with 393 viewsMelford

The USSR, after they were on the run after the start of Barbarossa basically dismantled factories and their living quarters, put them on a massive train and transported them into the Urals far out of range of any German bomber. They didn't just evacuate people, they evacuated whole factories lock, stock and barrel a few hundred miles away.
https://www.mhistory.net/comrades-we-are-transporting-the-whole-factory-evacuati

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 04:53 - Feb 22 with 348 viewsNewcyBlue

Liberty ships were the first ships to ever be completely welded. There were lessons to be learnt, the new welding techniques, overloading the ships, and the North Atlantic Ocean soon saw the ships succumb to stresses. Cracks would start, generally at the corners of hatches, and Liberty ships would break in half without warning.

It was found that the temperature of the Atlantic Ocean was causing the steel to change. This was a problem not seen with riveted ships.

It’s thoroughly fascinating.

Kaiser shipyards took the technique of mass manufacture from a British shipyard, Palmers of Jarrow. Palmers used rivets.

I love the Liberty ships, the ugly ducklings as they were called. When alongside in Baltimore we were close to a Liberty ship. The SS John W Brown. Looking at that from the deck of a giant container ship, all I could think of was the word “genesis”.

Shipbuilding has evolved, but Liberty ships were the start. Absolutely brilliant stuff.
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FAO Guthers & other historians on 05:19 - Feb 22 with 315 viewsRyorry

FAO Guthers & other historians on 23:53 - Feb 21 by Melford

The USSR, after they were on the run after the start of Barbarossa basically dismantled factories and their living quarters, put them on a massive train and transported them into the Urals far out of range of any German bomber. They didn't just evacuate people, they evacuated whole factories lock, stock and barrel a few hundred miles away.
https://www.mhistory.net/comrades-we-are-transporting-the-whole-factory-evacuati


Did some of the labour for that come from politicl prisoners, I wonder?

Great link, cheers.

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 05:23 - Feb 22 with 313 viewsRyorry

FAO Guthers & other historians on 04:53 - Feb 22 by NewcyBlue

Liberty ships were the first ships to ever be completely welded. There were lessons to be learnt, the new welding techniques, overloading the ships, and the North Atlantic Ocean soon saw the ships succumb to stresses. Cracks would start, generally at the corners of hatches, and Liberty ships would break in half without warning.

It was found that the temperature of the Atlantic Ocean was causing the steel to change. This was a problem not seen with riveted ships.

It’s thoroughly fascinating.

Kaiser shipyards took the technique of mass manufacture from a British shipyard, Palmers of Jarrow. Palmers used rivets.

I love the Liberty ships, the ugly ducklings as they were called. When alongside in Baltimore we were close to a Liberty ship. The SS John W Brown. Looking at that from the deck of a giant container ship, all I could think of was the word “genesis”.

Shipbuilding has evolved, but Liberty ships were the start. Absolutely brilliant stuff.


Wow, they didn't mention the problems, only the positives - thanks for the info, interesting stuff.

The SS JWB was given a nice ittle clip in the prog if you can find it on catchup

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FAO Guthers & other historians on 07:51 - Feb 22 with 279 viewsChurchman

I have seen a couple of them and they are excellent and well worth a watch. The two I’ve seen are on the UK and Germany. The contrast couldn’t be greater and not in the way you would imagine, given how we perceive German efficiency.

For the U.K. there are big lessons to be re-learned from that period about how private/public sector partnership can really work effectively.

I shan’t say more than that as I don’t want to spoil it for those who haven’t seen it
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