Quantcast
Please log in or register. Registered visitors get fewer ads.
Forum index | Previous Thread | Next thread
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over 16:00 - May 12 with 1503 viewsTommyparker

Aged 80 or over 12,451 (52%)
Aged 60-79 9,184 (39%)
Aged 40-59 1,890 (8%)
Aged 20-39 172 1(%)
Aged 0-19 12 0.05%)
1

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:03 - May 12 with 1193 viewsBlueBadger

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2019 estimated city population of 611,748. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. It is the fifth most visited city in the UK.

FOPRP.
Poll: Worst ever ITFC Paul.
Blog: From Despair to Where?

8
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:06 - May 12 with 1172 viewsTommyparker

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:03 - May 12 by BlueBadger

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2019 estimated city population of 611,748. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. It is the fifth most visited city in the UK.


As you can now play sports with your family
..... does this mean that Norwich will have an unfair advantage When The Football Starts Again?
0

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:07 - May 12 with 1165 viewsjeera

That's 52% of the population who have earned a better end than the one with which they have been met.

Well it looks like a duck, it sounds like a duck. Nope, dunno what it is.
Poll: Xmas dinner: Yorkshires or not?

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:08 - May 12 with 1149 viewsBlueBadger

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:06 - May 12 by Tommyparker

As you can now play sports with your family
..... does this mean that Norwich will have an unfair advantage When The Football Starts Again?


Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2019 estimated city population of 611,748. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. It is the fifth most visited city in the UK.

FOPRP.
Poll: Worst ever ITFC Paul.
Blog: From Despair to Where?

0

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:09 - May 12 with 1143 viewsfooters

Oh well, that's all right then.

footers QC - Prosecution Barrister, Hasketon Law Chambers
Poll: Best Fictional Dog - Round 3: The Bitch is Back

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:10 - May 12 with 1137 viewsmonytowbray

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:08 - May 12 by BlueBadger

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2019 estimated city population of 611,748. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. It is the fifth most visited city in the UK.


List of sexually active popes
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigationJump to search
This is a list of sexually active popes, Catholic priests who were not celibate before they became pope, and popes who were legally married. Some candidates were sexually active before their election as pope, and others were accused of being sexually active during their papacies. A number had offspring. The Second Lateran Council (1139) made the promise to remain celibate a prerequisite to ordination, abolishing the married priesthood. Sexual relationships were generally undertaken therefore outside the bond of matrimony and each sexual act thus committed is considered a mortal sin by the Roman Catholic Church.

There are various classifications for those who were sexually active at some time during their lives. Periods in parentheses refer to the years of their papacies.


Contents
1 Background
2 Popes who were legally married
3 Fathered illegitimate children before holy orders
4 Known to, or suspected of having fathered illegitimate children after receiving holy orders
4.1 Relationships with women
4.2 Relationships with women and men
5 Popes alleged to be sexually active during pontificate
5.1 Relationships with women
5.2 Relationships with men
5.3 Relationships with women and men
6 See also
7 Notes
8 References
Background
Main articles: Clerical celibacy (Catholic Church) and Catholic teachings on sexual morality
For many years of the Church's history, celibacy was considered optional. Based on the customs of the times, it is assumed by many that most of the Apostles, such as Peter, were married and had families. It is clear from the New Testament (Mk 1:29–31; Mt 8:14–15; Lk 4:38–39; 1 Tim 3:2, 12; Tit 1:6) that at least Peter had been married, and that bishops, presbyters and deacons of the Early Church were often married as well. It is also clear from epigraphy, the testimony of the Church Fathers, synodal legislation, papal decretals and other sources[not specific enough to verify] that in the following centuries a married clergy, in greater or lesser numbers, was a normal feature of the life of the Church. Celibacy was not required for those ordained, but still was a discipline that could be practised in the early Church, particularly by those in the monastic life.

Although various local Church councils had demanded celibacy of the clergy in a particular area,[1] it was not until the Second Lateran Council (1139) that whole of the Latin (Western) Rite of the Catholic Church decided to accept people for ordination only after they had taken a promise of celibacy. This applied to the leadership of the Church.[2]

Popes who were legally married
Name Reign(s) Relationship Offspring Notes
Saint Peter (Simon Peter) (30/33–64/68) Mother-in-law is mentioned in the Gospel verses Matthew 8:14–15, Luke 4:38, Mark 1:29–31 and who was healed by Jesus at her home in Capernaum. 1 Cor. 9:5 asks whether others have the right to be accompanied by Christian wives as does "Cephas" (Peter). Clement of Alexandria wrote: "When the blessed Peter saw his own wife led out to die, he rejoiced because of her summons and her return home, and called to her very encouragingly and comfortingly, addressing her by name, and saying, 'Remember the Lord.' Such was the marriage of the blessed, and their perfect disposition toward those dearest to them."[3] Yes[4] Later legends, dating from the 6th century onwards, suggested that Peter had a daughter – identified as Saint Petronilla. This, however, is likely to be a result of the similarity of their names.[5][6]
Felix III (483–492) Widowed before he was elected as pope Yes Himself the son of a priest he fathered two children, one of which was the antecedent of Pope Gregory the Great.[7]
Hormisdas (514–523) Widowed before he took holy orders Yes Father of Pope Silverius.[8]
Adrian II (867–872) Married to Stephania before he took holy orders,[9] she was still living when he was elected pope and resided with him in the Lateran Palace Yes (a daughter) His wife and daughter both resided with him until they were murdered by Eleutherius, brother of Anastasius Bibliothecarius, the Church's chief librarian.[10]
John XVII (1003) Married before his election as pope Yes (three sons) All of his children became priests.[11]
Clement IV (1265–1268) Married before taking holy orders Yes (two daughters) Both children entered a convent[12]
Honorius IV (1285–1287) Widowed before entered the clergy Yes (at least two sons)[13]
Fathered illegitimate children before holy orders
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Pius II (1458–1464) Not married Yes (at least two) Two children, both born before he formally entered the clergy. The first child fathered while in Scotland, but which died in infancy. A second child fathered while in Strasbourg with a Breton woman named Elizabeth. The child died 14 months later. Delayed becoming a cleric because of the requirement of chastity.[14]
Innocent VIII (1484–1492) Not married Yes (two) Both born before he entered the clergy.[15] Nepotism described as "lavish as it was shameless."[16] Married elder son Franceschetto Cybo to the daughter of Lorenzo de' Medici, who in return obtained the cardinal's hat for his 13-year-old son Giovanni, who became Pope Leo X.[17] His daughter Teodorina Cybo married Gerardo Usodimare.
Clement VII (1523–1534) Not married. Relationship with a slave girl – possibly Simonetta da Collevecchio Yes (one) Identified as Alessandro de' Medici, Duke of Florence.[18]
Known to, or suspected of having fathered illegitimate children after receiving holy orders
Relationships with women
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Paul III (1534–1549) Not married. Silvia Ruffini as mistress Yes (three sons and one daughter) Held off ordination in order to continue a promiscuous lifestyle, fathering four illegitimate children (three sons and one daughter) by Silvia Ruffini after his appointment as cardinal-deacon of Santi Cosimo and Damiano. He broke his relations with her ca. 1513. He made his illegitimate son Pier Luigi Farnese the first duke of Parma.[19][20]
Gregory XIII (1572–1585) Not married. Affair with Maddalena Fulchini Yes Received the ecclesiastical tonsure in Bologna in June 1539, but subsequently had an affair that resulted in the birth of Giacomo Boncompagni in 1548. Giacomo remained illegitimate but Gregory later appointed him Gonfalonier of the Church, governor of the Castel Sant'Angelo, as well as governor of Fermo.[21][22]
Leo XII (1823–1829) Not married Allegedly three As a young prelate was suspected of having had a liaison with the wife of a soldier of Swiss Guard and as nuncio in Germany allegedly fathered three illegitimate children.[23]
Relationships with women and men
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Julius II (1503–1513) Not married Yes (three daughters) Three illegitimate daughters, one of whom was Felice della Rovere (born in 1483, twenty years before his election as pope, but twelve years after his enthronement as bishop of Lausanne).[24] The schismatic Conciliabulum of Pisa, which sought to depose him in 1511, also accused him of being a sodomite.[25]
Popes alleged to be sexually active during pontificate
Relationships with women
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Sergius III (904–911) Not married Yes (at least one) Accused by opponents of being the illegitimate father of Pope John XI by Marozia.[26] Such accusations found in Liutprand of Cremona's Antapodosis,[27] as well as the Liber Pontificalis.[28][29][30] The accusations are disputed by another early source, the annalist Flodoard (c. 894–966): John XI was brother of Alberic II, the latter being the offspring of Marozia and her husband Alberic I, so John too may have been the son of Marozia and Alberic I. Fauvarque emphasizes that contemporary sources are dubious, Liutprand being "prone to exaggeration" while other mentions of this fatherhood appear in satires written by supporters of Pope Formosus.[31]
John X (914–928) Not married. Affairs with Theodora and Marozia. No Had romantic affairs with both Theodora and her daughter Marozia, according to Liutprand of Cremona in his Antapodosis.[32][33](See also Saeculum obscurum)
John XII (955–964) Not married No Accused by adversaries of adultery and incest.[34][35] Benedict of Soracte noted that he had "a collection of women." According to Liutprand of Cremona,[27] "they testified about his adultery, which they did not see with their own eyes, but nonetheless knew with certainty: he had fornicated with the widow of Rainier, with Stephana his father's concubine, with the widow Anna, and with his own niece, and he made the sacred palace into a whorehouse." According to Chamberlin, John was "a Christian Caligula whose crimes were rendered particularly horrific by the office he held".[36] Some sources report that he died 8 days after being stricken by paralysis while in the act of adultery,[34] others that he was killed by the jealous husband while in the act of committing adultery.[37][38][39][40]
Alexander VI (1492–1503) Not married. Relationships with Vanozza dei Catanei and Giulia Farnese. Yes (at least seven, possibly ten) Had a long affair with Vannozza dei Cattanei while still a priest, but before he became pope; and by her had his illegitimate children Cesare Borgia, Giovanni Borgia, Gioffre Borgia, and Lucrezia. A later mistress, Giulia Farnese, was the sister of Alessandro Farnese, and she gave birth to a daughter (Laura) while Alexander was in his 60s and reigning as pope.[41] Alexander fathered at least seven, and possibly as many as ten illegitimate children, and did much to promote his family's interests – using his offspring to build alliances with a number of important dynasties.[42] He appointed Giovanni Borgia as Captain General of the Church, and made Cesare a Cardinal of the Church – also creating independent duchies for each of them out of papal lands.
Relationships with men
Name Reign Relationship Notes
Paul II (1464–1471) Not married. Alleged affair with a page Thought to have died of indigestion arising from eating melon,[43][44] though suggestion that he died while being sodomised by a page.[45][46][47]
Sixtus IV (1471–1484) Not married According to Stefano Infessura, Sixtus was a "lover of boys and sodomites" – awarding benefices and bishoprics in return for sexual favours, and nominating a number of young men as cardinals, some of whom were celebrated for their good looks.[48][49][50] However, Infessura had partisan allegiances to the Colonna family and so is not considered to be always reliable or impartial.[51]
Leo X (1513–1521) Not married Accused, after his death, of homosexuality (by Francesco Guicciardini and Paolo Giovio). It has been suggested he may have had ulterior motives in offering preferment to Marcantonio Flaminio.[52]
Julius III (1550–1555) Not married. Alleged affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte Alleged to have had a long love affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte which was a cause of public scandal. The Venetian ambassador at that time reported that Innocenzo shared the pope's bed.[53]
Relationships with women and men
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Benedict IX (1032– became pope in 1044, again in 1045 and finally 1047–1048). Not married No Accused by Bishop Benno of Piacenza of "many vile adulteries."[54][55] Pope Victor III referred in his third book of Dialogues to "his rapes... and other unspeakable acts."[56] His life prompted Peter Damian to write an extended treatise against illicit sex in general, and homosexuality in particular. In his Liber Gomorrhianus, Damian accused Benedict IX of routine sodomy and bestiality and sponsoring orgies.[57][verification needed] In May 1045, Benedict IX resigned his office to get married.[58]
See also
Pope Joan
Antipope John XXIII and Antipope Felix V
History of clerical celibacy in the Christian Church

"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything."
Poll: How close will a TWTD election poll be next to June results?

1

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:11 - May 12 with 1131 viewsfactual_blue

Fake news. If you're under forty, you can't catch it.

Ta neige, Acadie, fait des larmes au soleil
Poll: What's the best name for this scandal?
Blog: [Blog] The Shape We're In

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:12 - May 12 with 1127 viewsfactual_blue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:06 - May 12 by Tommyparker

As you can now play sports with your family
..... does this mean that Norwich will have an unfair advantage When The Football Starts Again?


You're only allowed to play wiff-waff at the moment.

Ta neige, Acadie, fait des larmes au soleil
Poll: What's the best name for this scandal?
Blog: [Blog] The Shape We're In

0
Login to get fewer ads

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:13 - May 12 with 1124 viewsTommyparker

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:06 - May 12 by Tommyparker

As you can now play sports with your family
..... does this mean that Norwich will have an unfair advantage When The Football Starts Again?


Just back from taking the dog out
Following government advice,I stayed alert and, when I saw Covid-19 heading towards me I hid in a bush until it was gone.
IT'S COMMON SENSE INNIT.
0

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:37 - May 12 with 1066 viewsGeoffSentence

Confession time.

When these sort of statistics come out I compare them to my own position. So, shamefully and callously, I breathe a sigh of relief when it I find out that people of my age are less at risk, or that white people seem to be less at risk than ethnic minorities (for those who can't see me, I am white) but get all nervous when reminded that men suffer more (oh yeah, by the way, I am a fella) and get temporarily motivated to diet and exercise when reminded that people who are overweight are more at risk.

Sorry about the being relieved bits.

Out damned scot Out I say
Poll: Who has been our greatest Dane?

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:40 - May 12 with 1043 viewseireblue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:13 - May 12 by Tommyparker

Just back from taking the dog out
Following government advice,I stayed alert and, when I saw Covid-19 heading towards me I hid in a bush until it was gone.
IT'S COMMON SENSE INNIT.


Was it out jogging whilst carrying some fine-grained sandpaper?
0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:40 - May 12 with 1044 viewsChutney

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:07 - May 12 by jeera

That's 52% of the population who have earned a better end than the one with which they have been met.


Not 52% of the population. 52% of hospital Covid-19 deaths. Very different things.
0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:47 - May 12 with 1015 viewseireblue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:37 - May 12 by GeoffSentence

Confession time.

When these sort of statistics come out I compare them to my own position. So, shamefully and callously, I breathe a sigh of relief when it I find out that people of my age are less at risk, or that white people seem to be less at risk than ethnic minorities (for those who can't see me, I am white) but get all nervous when reminded that men suffer more (oh yeah, by the way, I am a fella) and get temporarily motivated to diet and exercise when reminded that people who are overweight are more at risk.

Sorry about the being relieved bits.


It is understandable.

I just focus on parents, and elderly in-laws, and really wanting to stay clear myself, so when the day comes, we can meet up when they feel safe.
0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:48 - May 12 with 1026 viewsbluelagos

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:37 - May 12 by GeoffSentence

Confession time.

When these sort of statistics come out I compare them to my own position. So, shamefully and callously, I breathe a sigh of relief when it I find out that people of my age are less at risk, or that white people seem to be less at risk than ethnic minorities (for those who can't see me, I am white) but get all nervous when reminded that men suffer more (oh yeah, by the way, I am a fella) and get temporarily motivated to diet and exercise when reminded that people who are overweight are more at risk.

Sorry about the being relieved bits.


When I was working in Liberia my employer sent me on a course about keeping safe in a dangerous place. They started with the stat that the most common NGO workers to die in similar places were 37 year old single males. As a 37 year old single male, that was a bit sobering.

Cyber pint for anyone who can guess either of the 2 most common causes of death amoungst those stats...

Poll: This new lockdown poll - what you reckon?

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:52 - May 12 with 1006 viewsRyorry

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:10 - May 12 by monytowbray

List of sexually active popes
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigationJump to search
This is a list of sexually active popes, Catholic priests who were not celibate before they became pope, and popes who were legally married. Some candidates were sexually active before their election as pope, and others were accused of being sexually active during their papacies. A number had offspring. The Second Lateran Council (1139) made the promise to remain celibate a prerequisite to ordination, abolishing the married priesthood. Sexual relationships were generally undertaken therefore outside the bond of matrimony and each sexual act thus committed is considered a mortal sin by the Roman Catholic Church.

There are various classifications for those who were sexually active at some time during their lives. Periods in parentheses refer to the years of their papacies.


Contents
1 Background
2 Popes who were legally married
3 Fathered illegitimate children before holy orders
4 Known to, or suspected of having fathered illegitimate children after receiving holy orders
4.1 Relationships with women
4.2 Relationships with women and men
5 Popes alleged to be sexually active during pontificate
5.1 Relationships with women
5.2 Relationships with men
5.3 Relationships with women and men
6 See also
7 Notes
8 References
Background
Main articles: Clerical celibacy (Catholic Church) and Catholic teachings on sexual morality
For many years of the Church's history, celibacy was considered optional. Based on the customs of the times, it is assumed by many that most of the Apostles, such as Peter, were married and had families. It is clear from the New Testament (Mk 1:29–31; Mt 8:14–15; Lk 4:38–39; 1 Tim 3:2, 12; Tit 1:6) that at least Peter had been married, and that bishops, presbyters and deacons of the Early Church were often married as well. It is also clear from epigraphy, the testimony of the Church Fathers, synodal legislation, papal decretals and other sources[not specific enough to verify] that in the following centuries a married clergy, in greater or lesser numbers, was a normal feature of the life of the Church. Celibacy was not required for those ordained, but still was a discipline that could be practised in the early Church, particularly by those in the monastic life.

Although various local Church councils had demanded celibacy of the clergy in a particular area,[1] it was not until the Second Lateran Council (1139) that whole of the Latin (Western) Rite of the Catholic Church decided to accept people for ordination only after they had taken a promise of celibacy. This applied to the leadership of the Church.[2]

Popes who were legally married
Name Reign(s) Relationship Offspring Notes
Saint Peter (Simon Peter) (30/33–64/68) Mother-in-law is mentioned in the Gospel verses Matthew 8:14–15, Luke 4:38, Mark 1:29–31 and who was healed by Jesus at her home in Capernaum. 1 Cor. 9:5 asks whether others have the right to be accompanied by Christian wives as does "Cephas" (Peter). Clement of Alexandria wrote: "When the blessed Peter saw his own wife led out to die, he rejoiced because of her summons and her return home, and called to her very encouragingly and comfortingly, addressing her by name, and saying, 'Remember the Lord.' Such was the marriage of the blessed, and their perfect disposition toward those dearest to them."[3] Yes[4] Later legends, dating from the 6th century onwards, suggested that Peter had a daughter – identified as Saint Petronilla. This, however, is likely to be a result of the similarity of their names.[5][6]
Felix III (483–492) Widowed before he was elected as pope Yes Himself the son of a priest he fathered two children, one of which was the antecedent of Pope Gregory the Great.[7]
Hormisdas (514–523) Widowed before he took holy orders Yes Father of Pope Silverius.[8]
Adrian II (867–872) Married to Stephania before he took holy orders,[9] she was still living when he was elected pope and resided with him in the Lateran Palace Yes (a daughter) His wife and daughter both resided with him until they were murdered by Eleutherius, brother of Anastasius Bibliothecarius, the Church's chief librarian.[10]
John XVII (1003) Married before his election as pope Yes (three sons) All of his children became priests.[11]
Clement IV (1265–1268) Married before taking holy orders Yes (two daughters) Both children entered a convent[12]
Honorius IV (1285–1287) Widowed before entered the clergy Yes (at least two sons)[13]
Fathered illegitimate children before holy orders
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Pius II (1458–1464) Not married Yes (at least two) Two children, both born before he formally entered the clergy. The first child fathered while in Scotland, but which died in infancy. A second child fathered while in Strasbourg with a Breton woman named Elizabeth. The child died 14 months later. Delayed becoming a cleric because of the requirement of chastity.[14]
Innocent VIII (1484–1492) Not married Yes (two) Both born before he entered the clergy.[15] Nepotism described as "lavish as it was shameless."[16] Married elder son Franceschetto Cybo to the daughter of Lorenzo de' Medici, who in return obtained the cardinal's hat for his 13-year-old son Giovanni, who became Pope Leo X.[17] His daughter Teodorina Cybo married Gerardo Usodimare.
Clement VII (1523–1534) Not married. Relationship with a slave girl – possibly Simonetta da Collevecchio Yes (one) Identified as Alessandro de' Medici, Duke of Florence.[18]
Known to, or suspected of having fathered illegitimate children after receiving holy orders
Relationships with women
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Paul III (1534–1549) Not married. Silvia Ruffini as mistress Yes (three sons and one daughter) Held off ordination in order to continue a promiscuous lifestyle, fathering four illegitimate children (three sons and one daughter) by Silvia Ruffini after his appointment as cardinal-deacon of Santi Cosimo and Damiano. He broke his relations with her ca. 1513. He made his illegitimate son Pier Luigi Farnese the first duke of Parma.[19][20]
Gregory XIII (1572–1585) Not married. Affair with Maddalena Fulchini Yes Received the ecclesiastical tonsure in Bologna in June 1539, but subsequently had an affair that resulted in the birth of Giacomo Boncompagni in 1548. Giacomo remained illegitimate but Gregory later appointed him Gonfalonier of the Church, governor of the Castel Sant'Angelo, as well as governor of Fermo.[21][22]
Leo XII (1823–1829) Not married Allegedly three As a young prelate was suspected of having had a liaison with the wife of a soldier of Swiss Guard and as nuncio in Germany allegedly fathered three illegitimate children.[23]
Relationships with women and men
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Julius II (1503–1513) Not married Yes (three daughters) Three illegitimate daughters, one of whom was Felice della Rovere (born in 1483, twenty years before his election as pope, but twelve years after his enthronement as bishop of Lausanne).[24] The schismatic Conciliabulum of Pisa, which sought to depose him in 1511, also accused him of being a sodomite.[25]
Popes alleged to be sexually active during pontificate
Relationships with women
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Sergius III (904–911) Not married Yes (at least one) Accused by opponents of being the illegitimate father of Pope John XI by Marozia.[26] Such accusations found in Liutprand of Cremona's Antapodosis,[27] as well as the Liber Pontificalis.[28][29][30] The accusations are disputed by another early source, the annalist Flodoard (c. 894–966): John XI was brother of Alberic II, the latter being the offspring of Marozia and her husband Alberic I, so John too may have been the son of Marozia and Alberic I. Fauvarque emphasizes that contemporary sources are dubious, Liutprand being "prone to exaggeration" while other mentions of this fatherhood appear in satires written by supporters of Pope Formosus.[31]
John X (914–928) Not married. Affairs with Theodora and Marozia. No Had romantic affairs with both Theodora and her daughter Marozia, according to Liutprand of Cremona in his Antapodosis.[32][33](See also Saeculum obscurum)
John XII (955–964) Not married No Accused by adversaries of adultery and incest.[34][35] Benedict of Soracte noted that he had "a collection of women." According to Liutprand of Cremona,[27] "they testified about his adultery, which they did not see with their own eyes, but nonetheless knew with certainty: he had fornicated with the widow of Rainier, with Stephana his father's concubine, with the widow Anna, and with his own niece, and he made the sacred palace into a whorehouse." According to Chamberlin, John was "a Christian Caligula whose crimes were rendered particularly horrific by the office he held".[36] Some sources report that he died 8 days after being stricken by paralysis while in the act of adultery,[34] others that he was killed by the jealous husband while in the act of committing adultery.[37][38][39][40]
Alexander VI (1492–1503) Not married. Relationships with Vanozza dei Catanei and Giulia Farnese. Yes (at least seven, possibly ten) Had a long affair with Vannozza dei Cattanei while still a priest, but before he became pope; and by her had his illegitimate children Cesare Borgia, Giovanni Borgia, Gioffre Borgia, and Lucrezia. A later mistress, Giulia Farnese, was the sister of Alessandro Farnese, and she gave birth to a daughter (Laura) while Alexander was in his 60s and reigning as pope.[41] Alexander fathered at least seven, and possibly as many as ten illegitimate children, and did much to promote his family's interests – using his offspring to build alliances with a number of important dynasties.[42] He appointed Giovanni Borgia as Captain General of the Church, and made Cesare a Cardinal of the Church – also creating independent duchies for each of them out of papal lands.
Relationships with men
Name Reign Relationship Notes
Paul II (1464–1471) Not married. Alleged affair with a page Thought to have died of indigestion arising from eating melon,[43][44] though suggestion that he died while being sodomised by a page.[45][46][47]
Sixtus IV (1471–1484) Not married According to Stefano Infessura, Sixtus was a "lover of boys and sodomites" – awarding benefices and bishoprics in return for sexual favours, and nominating a number of young men as cardinals, some of whom were celebrated for their good looks.[48][49][50] However, Infessura had partisan allegiances to the Colonna family and so is not considered to be always reliable or impartial.[51]
Leo X (1513–1521) Not married Accused, after his death, of homosexuality (by Francesco Guicciardini and Paolo Giovio). It has been suggested he may have had ulterior motives in offering preferment to Marcantonio Flaminio.[52]
Julius III (1550–1555) Not married. Alleged affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte Alleged to have had a long love affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte which was a cause of public scandal. The Venetian ambassador at that time reported that Innocenzo shared the pope's bed.[53]
Relationships with women and men
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Benedict IX (1032– became pope in 1044, again in 1045 and finally 1047–1048). Not married No Accused by Bishop Benno of Piacenza of "many vile adulteries."[54][55] Pope Victor III referred in his third book of Dialogues to "his rapes... and other unspeakable acts."[56] His life prompted Peter Damian to write an extended treatise against illicit sex in general, and homosexuality in particular. In his Liber Gomorrhianus, Damian accused Benedict IX of routine sodomy and bestiality and sponsoring orgies.[57][verification needed] In May 1045, Benedict IX resigned his office to get married.[58]
See also
Pope Joan
Antipope John XXIII and Antipope Felix V
History of clerical celibacy in the Christian Church


Maybe they fiddled, err, the figures ...

Poll: Should VAR be abolished

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:55 - May 12 with 995 viewseireblue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:48 - May 12 by bluelagos

When I was working in Liberia my employer sent me on a course about keeping safe in a dangerous place. They started with the stat that the most common NGO workers to die in similar places were 37 year old single males. As a 37 year old single male, that was a bit sobering.

Cyber pint for anyone who can guess either of the 2 most common causes of death amoungst those stats...


Being assaulted after getting people to look for non-existent figures on currency?
1
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 17:07 - May 12 with 958 viewsSharkey

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:48 - May 12 by bluelagos

When I was working in Liberia my employer sent me on a course about keeping safe in a dangerous place. They started with the stat that the most common NGO workers to die in similar places were 37 year old single males. As a 37 year old single male, that was a bit sobering.

Cyber pint for anyone who can guess either of the 2 most common causes of death amoungst those stats...


Road accidents and ebola?
0
Was it polar bear attacks..... on 17:10 - May 12 with 953 viewsBloots

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:48 - May 12 by bluelagos

When I was working in Liberia my employer sent me on a course about keeping safe in a dangerous place. They started with the stat that the most common NGO workers to die in similar places were 37 year old single males. As a 37 year old single male, that was a bit sobering.

Cyber pint for anyone who can guess either of the 2 most common causes of death amoungst those stats...


….and falling into ornamental garden ponds?

Lambert out.
Poll: How many will Hull beat us by on Tuesday?

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 17:14 - May 12 with 939 viewsChutney

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:48 - May 12 by bluelagos

When I was working in Liberia my employer sent me on a course about keeping safe in a dangerous place. They started with the stat that the most common NGO workers to die in similar places were 37 year old single males. As a 37 year old single male, that was a bit sobering.

Cyber pint for anyone who can guess either of the 2 most common causes of death amoungst those stats...


w**king over George Weah?
0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:07 - May 12 with 862 viewsbluelagos

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 17:07 - May 12 by Sharkey

Road accidents and ebola?


Road accidents was No 1.

No 2 was a different illness - malaria.

Cyber pint to Mr Sharkey.

Poll: This new lockdown poll - what you reckon?

0

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:07 - May 12 with 859 viewsPecker

And your point is what?
0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:13 - May 12 with 834 viewslowhouseblue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:10 - May 12 by monytowbray

List of sexually active popes
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigationJump to search
This is a list of sexually active popes, Catholic priests who were not celibate before they became pope, and popes who were legally married. Some candidates were sexually active before their election as pope, and others were accused of being sexually active during their papacies. A number had offspring. The Second Lateran Council (1139) made the promise to remain celibate a prerequisite to ordination, abolishing the married priesthood. Sexual relationships were generally undertaken therefore outside the bond of matrimony and each sexual act thus committed is considered a mortal sin by the Roman Catholic Church.

There are various classifications for those who were sexually active at some time during their lives. Periods in parentheses refer to the years of their papacies.


Contents
1 Background
2 Popes who were legally married
3 Fathered illegitimate children before holy orders
4 Known to, or suspected of having fathered illegitimate children after receiving holy orders
4.1 Relationships with women
4.2 Relationships with women and men
5 Popes alleged to be sexually active during pontificate
5.1 Relationships with women
5.2 Relationships with men
5.3 Relationships with women and men
6 See also
7 Notes
8 References
Background
Main articles: Clerical celibacy (Catholic Church) and Catholic teachings on sexual morality
For many years of the Church's history, celibacy was considered optional. Based on the customs of the times, it is assumed by many that most of the Apostles, such as Peter, were married and had families. It is clear from the New Testament (Mk 1:29–31; Mt 8:14–15; Lk 4:38–39; 1 Tim 3:2, 12; Tit 1:6) that at least Peter had been married, and that bishops, presbyters and deacons of the Early Church were often married as well. It is also clear from epigraphy, the testimony of the Church Fathers, synodal legislation, papal decretals and other sources[not specific enough to verify] that in the following centuries a married clergy, in greater or lesser numbers, was a normal feature of the life of the Church. Celibacy was not required for those ordained, but still was a discipline that could be practised in the early Church, particularly by those in the monastic life.

Although various local Church councils had demanded celibacy of the clergy in a particular area,[1] it was not until the Second Lateran Council (1139) that whole of the Latin (Western) Rite of the Catholic Church decided to accept people for ordination only after they had taken a promise of celibacy. This applied to the leadership of the Church.[2]

Popes who were legally married
Name Reign(s) Relationship Offspring Notes
Saint Peter (Simon Peter) (30/33–64/68) Mother-in-law is mentioned in the Gospel verses Matthew 8:14–15, Luke 4:38, Mark 1:29–31 and who was healed by Jesus at her home in Capernaum. 1 Cor. 9:5 asks whether others have the right to be accompanied by Christian wives as does "Cephas" (Peter). Clement of Alexandria wrote: "When the blessed Peter saw his own wife led out to die, he rejoiced because of her summons and her return home, and called to her very encouragingly and comfortingly, addressing her by name, and saying, 'Remember the Lord.' Such was the marriage of the blessed, and their perfect disposition toward those dearest to them."[3] Yes[4] Later legends, dating from the 6th century onwards, suggested that Peter had a daughter – identified as Saint Petronilla. This, however, is likely to be a result of the similarity of their names.[5][6]
Felix III (483–492) Widowed before he was elected as pope Yes Himself the son of a priest he fathered two children, one of which was the antecedent of Pope Gregory the Great.[7]
Hormisdas (514–523) Widowed before he took holy orders Yes Father of Pope Silverius.[8]
Adrian II (867–872) Married to Stephania before he took holy orders,[9] she was still living when he was elected pope and resided with him in the Lateran Palace Yes (a daughter) His wife and daughter both resided with him until they were murdered by Eleutherius, brother of Anastasius Bibliothecarius, the Church's chief librarian.[10]
John XVII (1003) Married before his election as pope Yes (three sons) All of his children became priests.[11]
Clement IV (1265–1268) Married before taking holy orders Yes (two daughters) Both children entered a convent[12]
Honorius IV (1285–1287) Widowed before entered the clergy Yes (at least two sons)[13]
Fathered illegitimate children before holy orders
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Pius II (1458–1464) Not married Yes (at least two) Two children, both born before he formally entered the clergy. The first child fathered while in Scotland, but which died in infancy. A second child fathered while in Strasbourg with a Breton woman named Elizabeth. The child died 14 months later. Delayed becoming a cleric because of the requirement of chastity.[14]
Innocent VIII (1484–1492) Not married Yes (two) Both born before he entered the clergy.[15] Nepotism described as "lavish as it was shameless."[16] Married elder son Franceschetto Cybo to the daughter of Lorenzo de' Medici, who in return obtained the cardinal's hat for his 13-year-old son Giovanni, who became Pope Leo X.[17] His daughter Teodorina Cybo married Gerardo Usodimare.
Clement VII (1523–1534) Not married. Relationship with a slave girl – possibly Simonetta da Collevecchio Yes (one) Identified as Alessandro de' Medici, Duke of Florence.[18]
Known to, or suspected of having fathered illegitimate children after receiving holy orders
Relationships with women
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Paul III (1534–1549) Not married. Silvia Ruffini as mistress Yes (three sons and one daughter) Held off ordination in order to continue a promiscuous lifestyle, fathering four illegitimate children (three sons and one daughter) by Silvia Ruffini after his appointment as cardinal-deacon of Santi Cosimo and Damiano. He broke his relations with her ca. 1513. He made his illegitimate son Pier Luigi Farnese the first duke of Parma.[19][20]
Gregory XIII (1572–1585) Not married. Affair with Maddalena Fulchini Yes Received the ecclesiastical tonsure in Bologna in June 1539, but subsequently had an affair that resulted in the birth of Giacomo Boncompagni in 1548. Giacomo remained illegitimate but Gregory later appointed him Gonfalonier of the Church, governor of the Castel Sant'Angelo, as well as governor of Fermo.[21][22]
Leo XII (1823–1829) Not married Allegedly three As a young prelate was suspected of having had a liaison with the wife of a soldier of Swiss Guard and as nuncio in Germany allegedly fathered three illegitimate children.[23]
Relationships with women and men
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Julius II (1503–1513) Not married Yes (three daughters) Three illegitimate daughters, one of whom was Felice della Rovere (born in 1483, twenty years before his election as pope, but twelve years after his enthronement as bishop of Lausanne).[24] The schismatic Conciliabulum of Pisa, which sought to depose him in 1511, also accused him of being a sodomite.[25]
Popes alleged to be sexually active during pontificate
Relationships with women
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Sergius III (904–911) Not married Yes (at least one) Accused by opponents of being the illegitimate father of Pope John XI by Marozia.[26] Such accusations found in Liutprand of Cremona's Antapodosis,[27] as well as the Liber Pontificalis.[28][29][30] The accusations are disputed by another early source, the annalist Flodoard (c. 894–966): John XI was brother of Alberic II, the latter being the offspring of Marozia and her husband Alberic I, so John too may have been the son of Marozia and Alberic I. Fauvarque emphasizes that contemporary sources are dubious, Liutprand being "prone to exaggeration" while other mentions of this fatherhood appear in satires written by supporters of Pope Formosus.[31]
John X (914–928) Not married. Affairs with Theodora and Marozia. No Had romantic affairs with both Theodora and her daughter Marozia, according to Liutprand of Cremona in his Antapodosis.[32][33](See also Saeculum obscurum)
John XII (955–964) Not married No Accused by adversaries of adultery and incest.[34][35] Benedict of Soracte noted that he had "a collection of women." According to Liutprand of Cremona,[27] "they testified about his adultery, which they did not see with their own eyes, but nonetheless knew with certainty: he had fornicated with the widow of Rainier, with Stephana his father's concubine, with the widow Anna, and with his own niece, and he made the sacred palace into a whorehouse." According to Chamberlin, John was "a Christian Caligula whose crimes were rendered particularly horrific by the office he held".[36] Some sources report that he died 8 days after being stricken by paralysis while in the act of adultery,[34] others that he was killed by the jealous husband while in the act of committing adultery.[37][38][39][40]
Alexander VI (1492–1503) Not married. Relationships with Vanozza dei Catanei and Giulia Farnese. Yes (at least seven, possibly ten) Had a long affair with Vannozza dei Cattanei while still a priest, but before he became pope; and by her had his illegitimate children Cesare Borgia, Giovanni Borgia, Gioffre Borgia, and Lucrezia. A later mistress, Giulia Farnese, was the sister of Alessandro Farnese, and she gave birth to a daughter (Laura) while Alexander was in his 60s and reigning as pope.[41] Alexander fathered at least seven, and possibly as many as ten illegitimate children, and did much to promote his family's interests – using his offspring to build alliances with a number of important dynasties.[42] He appointed Giovanni Borgia as Captain General of the Church, and made Cesare a Cardinal of the Church – also creating independent duchies for each of them out of papal lands.
Relationships with men
Name Reign Relationship Notes
Paul II (1464–1471) Not married. Alleged affair with a page Thought to have died of indigestion arising from eating melon,[43][44] though suggestion that he died while being sodomised by a page.[45][46][47]
Sixtus IV (1471–1484) Not married According to Stefano Infessura, Sixtus was a "lover of boys and sodomites" – awarding benefices and bishoprics in return for sexual favours, and nominating a number of young men as cardinals, some of whom were celebrated for their good looks.[48][49][50] However, Infessura had partisan allegiances to the Colonna family and so is not considered to be always reliable or impartial.[51]
Leo X (1513–1521) Not married Accused, after his death, of homosexuality (by Francesco Guicciardini and Paolo Giovio). It has been suggested he may have had ulterior motives in offering preferment to Marcantonio Flaminio.[52]
Julius III (1550–1555) Not married. Alleged affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte Alleged to have had a long love affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte which was a cause of public scandal. The Venetian ambassador at that time reported that Innocenzo shared the pope's bed.[53]
Relationships with women and men
Name Reign Relationship Offspring Notes
Benedict IX (1032– became pope in 1044, again in 1045 and finally 1047–1048). Not married No Accused by Bishop Benno of Piacenza of "many vile adulteries."[54][55] Pope Victor III referred in his third book of Dialogues to "his rapes... and other unspeakable acts."[56] His life prompted Peter Damian to write an extended treatise against illicit sex in general, and homosexuality in particular. In his Liber Gomorrhianus, Damian accused Benedict IX of routine sodomy and bestiality and sponsoring orgies.[57][verification needed] In May 1045, Benedict IX resigned his office to get married.[58]
See also
Pope Joan
Antipope John XXIII and Antipope Felix V
History of clerical celibacy in the Christian Church


that was actually quite interesting

And so as the loose-bowelled pigeon of time swoops low over the unsuspecting tourist of destiny, and the flatulent skunk of fate wanders into the air-conditioning system of eternity, I notice it's the end of the show

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:31 - May 12 with 792 viewsPinewoodblue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:13 - May 12 by Tommyparker

Just back from taking the dog out
Following government advice,I stayed alert and, when I saw Covid-19 heading towards me I hid in a bush until it was gone.
IT'S COMMON SENSE INNIT.


‘Just back from taking the dog out” seems a bit drastic what did the dog do wrong?

Poll: how many changes to starting 11 v Wcombe

1
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:35 - May 12 with 786 viewsPinewoodblue

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:13 - May 12 by lowhouseblue

that was actually quite interesting


You must be the only one to read it, Tommy Parker tried but but got lost before the end of the second paragraph

Poll: how many changes to starting 11 v Wcombe

0
91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 18:47 - May 12 with 767 viewsjeera

91% of all England hospital Covid-19 deaths have been people aged 60 or over on 16:40 - May 12 by Chutney

Not 52% of the population. 52% of hospital Covid-19 deaths. Very different things.


Yes, that's the most important thing to point out.


Edit: it should be obvious what I meant.
[Post edited 12 May 19:43]

Well it looks like a duck, it sounds like a duck. Nope, dunno what it is.
Poll: Xmas dinner: Yorkshires or not?

0

Please log in or register. Registered visitors get fewer ads.
About Us Contact Us Terms & Conditions Privacy Cookies Advertising
© TWTD 1995-2020