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Question 13:18 - May 14 with 300 viewsNthsuffolkblue

If cheese and coffee can distract when working from home, would a bar at work not be even more of a distraction?

Poll: Favourite pizza
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Question on 14:08 - May 14 with 246 viewsChurchman

It would be for me if I’d worked anywhere that had one, but it clearly isn’t for him. Just coffee and cheese. Nether were those a distraction to me as I rarely drink coffee and don’t eat cheese like that.

What he had to say about working at home was in my opinion total nonsense. In the 21st century, flexible working is a great idea if the nature of the job and the ever improving technology allows it.

The needs of the business should always come first. Pre pandemic, I would always try and do a day WAH a week. The nature of project work and the home set up meant I could. Not always the same day because face to face meetings (some have to be done that way) came first. Working at home meant I could do certain stuff without interruption or distraction.

Working at home meant no 3 hour commute that day or struggling to find a desk - the very office String bean Reece Smug left his pathetic notes in was redesigned for drop in desk working and there were no allocated desks in theory. Osborn had insisted a further 1000 staff be stuffed into a building with a design (and lease) capacity for 1800. The desk ratio was actually far poorer than 8 for 10 people because people like him insisted that their private office staff have their own desks.

At home I would generally start work at 6.30/7.00 and work through to 4.00 ish, unless there was a hated late dial in.

It meant that for example one day I could attend a neighbour’s funeral. 2 hours out of the day, in my electronic calendar, back working until I was done. It meant not taking a day off unnecessarily or missing the funeral. Flexible working allowed me to work the week after my mother died when I also needed to be in Suffolk with my dad and arranging a funeral. It meant that during the Christmas period one or two of us could keep things ticking over without braving public transport between Christmas and new year. These are just a few of the benefits I found with it.

Some people don’t have the accommodation, the tech or the wish to do it. Some business just don’t work with flexible working. Some people like Boris Johnson are so lazy they won’t do the work, even if you chain him to an oar and lay the lash on him. Individuals not doing the work is a management issue.

Work should be all about delivery and if people don’t deliver then they should be held to account for it. That applies if the work in a Covid ridden office, home or on Johnson’s galley.

Rant over.
[Post edited 14 May 14:10]
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Question on 14:14 - May 14 with 226 viewsNthsuffolkblue

Question on 14:08 - May 14 by Churchman

It would be for me if I’d worked anywhere that had one, but it clearly isn’t for him. Just coffee and cheese. Nether were those a distraction to me as I rarely drink coffee and don’t eat cheese like that.

What he had to say about working at home was in my opinion total nonsense. In the 21st century, flexible working is a great idea if the nature of the job and the ever improving technology allows it.

The needs of the business should always come first. Pre pandemic, I would always try and do a day WAH a week. The nature of project work and the home set up meant I could. Not always the same day because face to face meetings (some have to be done that way) came first. Working at home meant I could do certain stuff without interruption or distraction.

Working at home meant no 3 hour commute that day or struggling to find a desk - the very office String bean Reece Smug left his pathetic notes in was redesigned for drop in desk working and there were no allocated desks in theory. Osborn had insisted a further 1000 staff be stuffed into a building with a design (and lease) capacity for 1800. The desk ratio was actually far poorer than 8 for 10 people because people like him insisted that their private office staff have their own desks.

At home I would generally start work at 6.30/7.00 and work through to 4.00 ish, unless there was a hated late dial in.

It meant that for example one day I could attend a neighbour’s funeral. 2 hours out of the day, in my electronic calendar, back working until I was done. It meant not taking a day off unnecessarily or missing the funeral. Flexible working allowed me to work the week after my mother died when I also needed to be in Suffolk with my dad and arranging a funeral. It meant that during the Christmas period one or two of us could keep things ticking over without braving public transport between Christmas and new year. These are just a few of the benefits I found with it.

Some people don’t have the accommodation, the tech or the wish to do it. Some business just don’t work with flexible working. Some people like Boris Johnson are so lazy they won’t do the work, even if you chain him to an oar and lay the lash on him. Individuals not doing the work is a management issue.

Work should be all about delivery and if people don’t deliver then they should be held to account for it. That applies if the work in a Covid ridden office, home or on Johnson’s galley.

Rant over.
[Post edited 14 May 14:10]


The key thing is that his argument was as relevant to most workplaces as it is to working from home and says more about him than the majority of people.

The real test of WFH is whether the job gets done. I suspect that in the vast majority of cases, people are at least as productive if not far more so when working from home. And if an employer cannot tell whether the job is being done, that says a lot about the employer.

Poll: Favourite pizza
Blog: [Blog] Ghostbusters

1

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